Graduate Program Requirements

For application information and standard requirements, please go to the Graduate College and the Department of History's Information for Prospective Students.  Within the Division, degree requirements are specifically tailored to the individual student and will be discussed during the application review process.  For more information, please see Student Assessment.

For information about scheduling an informatory trip to campus, please contact the Program Coordinator, Luise Betterton, at (520) 626-5448 or bettertm@email.arizona.edu .

History 696F

The distinguishing characteristic of Division students' course of study is regular enrollment in the so-called Division Seminar, History 696F, Early Modern Europe. This seminar is offered on a different topic virtually every semester and provides invaluable opportunities for serious late-medievalist/early-modernist students to expand their knowledge into diverse subjects and at every phase of their progress—except when away carrying out dissertation research—to interact with and assist one another.

Among past topics have been the following:

    * Fall 2015, Lotz-Heumann: The Long Reformation in Tudor and Stuart Britain
    * Spring 2015, Milliman: Games and Play in Medieval and Early Modern Europe
    * Fall 2014, Karant-Nunn: Anabaptism
    * Spring 2014, Graizbord: The Jews of Early Modern Europe
    * Fall 2013, Lotz-Heumann: Religious Conversion in Early Modern Europe
    * Spring 2013, Milliman: Conversion, Apostasy, and Heresy
    * Fall 2012, Cuneo: Problems in Renaissance-Baroque Art
    * Spring 2012, Karant-Nunn: Religious Biography
    * Fall 2011, Lotz-Heumann: Is A History of Early Modern Popular Culture/Religion Possible?
    * Spring 2011, Karant-Nunn: Toleration
    * Fall 2010, Graizbord: Religion and Ethnicity in Late Medieval and Early Modern Iberia
    * Spring 2010, Karant-Nunn: Education
    * Fall 2009, Lotz-Heumann: Confessional Churches in Early Modern Europe
    * Spring 2009, White : Augustan Rome and the Holy Roman Empire
    * Fall 2008, Lotz-Heumann: Early Modern Ireland in Comparative Perspective
    * Spring 2008, Karant-Nunn: The Emotions in Medieval and Early Modern Europe
    * Fall 2007, Brady: The Reformations in the Holy Roman Empire
    * Spring 2007, McBride [Listed as Women's Studies 500]: Body Politics in early modern England
    * Fall 2006, Graizbord: Early modern European Judaism
    * Spring 2006, Karant-Nunn: Preachers and Preaching
    * Fall 2005, Nader: The Habsburgs
    * Spring 2005, Cuneo: Art and the Reformation
    * Fall 2004, Karant-Nunn: Literacy in early modern Europe
    * Fall 2003-Spring 2004, Bernstein: Economic Foundations of the High and Late Medieval Catholic Church
    * Spring 2003, Karant-Nunn: Anabaptism
    * Fall 2002, Nader: Charity in early modern Spain
    * Spring 2002, Karant-Nunn: The Family in early modern Europe
    * Fall 2001, Karant-Nunn: Strasbourg and the Reformation
    * Spring 2001, Oberman: Martin Bucer's De regno Christi

Every semester, at least one internationally renowned guest scholar comes to the seminar. Among recent guests have been Irena Backus; Thomas A. Brady, Jr.; Caroline Walker Bynum; Miriam Usher Chrisman; Patrick Collinson; Carlos M. N. Eire; James M. Estes; Theodore Evergates; Paul Freedman; Bruce Gordon; Harvey J. Graff; Scott H. Hendrix; William Chester Jordan; Robert Kingdon; Hartmut Lehmann; H. C. Erik Midelfort; Maureen Miller; David Nirenberg; Andrew Pettegree; Bernard Roussel; Erika Rummel; Anne Jacobson Schutte; Tom Scott; James M. Stayer; James D. Tracy; Merry Wiesner-Hanks; and Charles Zika.

For additional required courses, please see the UA History Department Graduate Handbook.  Among the  courses offered are:

   *   CLASSICS 510A—METHODS IN CLASSICAL STUDIES
       Introduction to the various disciplines of classical scholarship; philology, textual criticism, paleography, papyrology,
       archaeology.
 
   *   HISTORY 505A/B—MEDIEVAL EUROPE
       Major institutions and trends in Europe from the breakup of the Roman World to the fourteenth century.
 
   *   HISTORY 507 A/B—INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL EUROPE
       Major medieval cultural and intellectual trends.
       507A: High Medieval Europe. Emphasis on the period before 1300 
       507B: Late Medieval/Early Modern Europe. Emphasis on the period after 1300.
 
   *   HISTORY 508—THE RENAISSANCE
       Europe between the 14th and 16th centuries with special emphasis on Italy as the seat of the Renaissance. Topics
       include the city states, humanism, the Church in an age of Schism and secularization, Renaissance art, the New
       Monarchies and European exploration and imperialism. Graduate level requirements include an in-depth research
       paper.
 
   *   HISTORY 509—THE REFORMATION
       The Reformation in thought and action both from the perspective of its religious origins and of the political and social
       conditions. Analysis of its impact on sixteenth-century Europe, including the spread of the Protestant Reformation and
       its companion movement, the Counter-Reformation.
 
   *   HISTORY 695C—ADVANCED STUDIES IN EUROPEAN HISTORY COLLOQUIUM
       The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often
       includes lectures by several different persons.
 
   *   HISTORY 695H—COMPARATIVE HISTORY COLLOQUIUM
       The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often
       includes lectures by several different persons.
 
   *   HISTORY 695K—HISTORIOGRAPHY COLLOQUIUM
       The exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research, usually in a small group setting. Instruction often
       includes lectures by several different persons.
 
   *   LATIN 501—LATIN READING COURSE
       Readings in one of the following: epic, lyric, drama, history, oratory, satire, epistles, novel, philosophical, technical, or
       medieval literature.
 
   *   LATIN 514—MEDIEVAL LATIN
       Survey of Latin literature during the thousand years between the end of the classical period and the beginning of the
       Renaissance.
 
   *   LATIN 520—LATIN PALEOGRAPHY
       Identification and reading of major Latin bookhands of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Problems in text
       transmission, corruptions, and emendation.

 
For more information about courses scheduled for this or future semesters, please visit Schedule of Classes.

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