Performance, Publicity and Polemic: The Politics of Exorcism in Post-Reformation England

Date: 

Fri, 10/30/2015 - 03:00

Please join us for a guest lecture by Peter Lake, University Distinguished Professor of History, Professor of the History of Christianity, and Martha Rivers Ingram Chair of History at Vanderbilt Universityon
Friday, October 30, 3:00 PM
Louise Foucar Marshall Building, Room 340

The lecture will address exorcism as a site for the performance of the spiritual power and truth claims of various rival religious styles, and the different media used to project that power to a series of wider audiences.

Professor Lake's scholarly work focuses on post-Reformation English history, principally the Elizabethan and early Stuart periods.  He is the author or co-author of five books, The Trials of Margaret Clitherow: Persecution, Martyrdom and the Politics of Sanctity in Elizabethan England (London and New York, 2011); The Antichrist’s Lewd Hat: Protestants, Papists and Players in Post-Reformation England (New Haven, 2002); The Boxmaker’s Revenge: ‘Orthodoxy’, ‘Heterodoxy’ and the Politics of the Parish in Early Stuart London (Redwood City, 2001); Anglicans and Puritans?: Presbyterianism and English Conformist Thought from Whitgift to Hooker (London, 1988); and Moderate Puritans and the Elizabethan Church (Cambridge, 1982).  He is also the co-editor of six collections of essays.  Professor Lake’s current research explores Shakespeare’s history plays and the religious and dynastic politics of the 1590s; Catholic critiques of the Elizabethan regime as a tyranny and a conspiracy of evil counsel; as well as Samuel Clarke’s collections of godly lives.

Co-sponsors:
Department of History
Department of English
Department of Religious Studies
Institute for the Study of Religion and Culture (ISRC)
Religion, Secularism, and Political Belonging (RELSEC)

Supporters:
Group for Early Modern Studies (GEMS)
University of Arizona Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Committee (UAMARRC)

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